The size. Is it important?

25/06/2014 944 views

-This large painting is bad. So, the small version of it wouldn’t be better either.

– Just a moment. Sorry for interruption, but what does it mean “BAD” and who decides it ?

w8k4uDStXesThis discussion started suddenly. The young artist reacted very emotionally to the viewer’s feedback. How he dared to judge the artwork by means of these strange categories “like- means a successful art”, “dislike- means a bad one”.

I listened to it without interfering. Both of them are right in a certain way. Showing the artwork to the audience, the artist should be ready, that his way of thinking and depiction of the thoughts on canvas may leave the audience indifferent. And looking for the answer “why is it so” isn’t essential. Both the viewer and the artist are free in their estimation. Contemporary art is the special Math, in which 2+1=4 and 4-2=2. Everything is allergorical. Tradition became unimportant. The quality of art hasn’t much to do with the recognition of it, the subtlety of colors, the excellent composition and the characteristic brushstrokes… all these don’t let the viewer hold the breath while looking at the painting… What then?

EMOTIONS!! Art either speaks to the viewer and encourage him to think, it may come him back to past or let to see the present in a different way.. or let his look stonelike, without any visable emotions on the face. Emotions are the main priority for the lively dialogue of two: the painting and the veiwer.

And what about the size? Size is only the first attempt to lure the artist into the light flirt. Will it start? Who knows… Communication between the painting and the viewer is the intimate area of two. Triangles aren’t wished there, they are superfluous, so I’m getting silent 🙂

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Revelation: Major Painting by Jules Olitski,  2012, Canaday Gallery

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Revelation: Major Painting by Jules Olitski,  2012, Canaday Gallery

Peter Doig, Concrete Cabin II, 1992, Öl auf Leinwand, 200 x 275 cm , Collection of Victoria and Warren Miro
Peter Doig, Concrete Cabin II, 1992, oil on canvas, 200 x 275 cm , Collection of Victoria and Warren Miro
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My Solo Exhibition “Piano”

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